Go, Tell It On The Mountain That Jesus Christ Is Born

John Wesley Work, Jr.

Born: Au­gust 6, 1872, Nash­ville, Ten­nes­see.Died: Sep­tem­ber 7, 1925, Nash­ville, Ten­nes­see.

Son of a church choir director, Work grad­u­at­ed from Fisk Un­i­ver­si­ty (AB 1895, MA 1898). He taught La­tin and Greek at Fisk, be­com­ing chair­man of the La­tin & His­to­ry De­part­ments in 1906. From 1923 un­til his death, he served as pres­i­dent of Ro­ger Wil­liams Un­i­ver­si­ty in Nash­ville, Ten­nes­see.

Work was a pi­o­neer in col­lect­ing, per­form­ing, and pre­serv­ing Af­ri­can-Amer­i­can folk mu­sic.

Go Tell It On The Mountain

Go, tell it on the mountain,
Over the hills and everywhere
Go, tell it on the mountain,
That Jesus Christ is born.

While shepherds kept their watching
Over silent flocks by night
Behold throughout the heavens
There shone a holy light.

The shepherds feared and trembled,
When lo! above the earth,
Rang out the angels chorus
That hailed the Savior’s birth.

Down in a lowly manger
The humble Christ was born
And God sent us salvation
That blessèd Christmas morn.

page source Cyber Hymnal

John Stott On Nominal Christians

taken from Basic Christianity: “The Christian landscape is strewn with the wreckage of derelict, half-built towers – the ruins of those who began to build and were unable to finish. For thousands of people still ignore Christ’s warning and undertake to follow him without first pausing to reflect on the cost of doing so. The result is the great scandal of Christendom today, so-called ‘nominal Christianity’. In countries to which Christian civilization has spread, large numbers of people have covered themselves with a decent, but thin, veneer of Christianity. They have allowed themselves to become somewhat involved; enough to be respectable but not enough to be uncomfortable. Their religion is a great, soft cushion. It protects them from the hard unpleasantness of life, while changing its place and shape to suit the convenience. no wonder the cynics speak of hypocrites in the church and dismiss religion as escapism.” (p. 108)

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